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Nashville Psy

Nashville Psy * with The Scam and The Dwarves at Old Rock House, August 14, 2011

*Please note the full title of this band has been abbreviated, to prevent our site from inappropriately being labeled as ‘mature’ subject matter by web crawlers and various browser filters.

Have you ever seen a show that had so much energy that from the opening act to the closing one, that it had the audience rocking like there was no tomorrow? Well, that happened on August 14, 2011  at the Old Rock House in St Louis, MO.

The St. Louis punk rock band The Scam opened the show. I should have known what would be in store before the band ever took the stage. The group arrived at the venue in a modified van that had three fourths of the roof hacked off of it and seats aligned around the sides, with emergency vehicle strobes flashing; people were screaming through a bull horn, and half of the occupants could seemingly barely walk straight.

The Scam at Old Rock House

The Scam at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

It just didn’t start to register what I had gotten myself into until the first note of the opening song, “Dirty Old Shoes”. Focused on trying to get photographs, I did not notice all the sane individuals aligning themselves against the walls. Then it happened! As vocalist James Gallagher started shouting the lyrics, I could see out of the corner of my eye the floor becoming a black hole. There was no escape and all you could do was brace for impact! The pit was brutal, with a mob circling the room, and then a brave person would dash though the center to test out the laws of physics. Fueling the fire was the band’s edgy, in-your-face performance. With vocalist James Gallagher and bassist Spaceman egging the mass on, as the band ripped through the songs, “How Could I Be Wrong”, “Problems”, “Say Another Word” and “Rock Bottom”.

The Scam at Old Rock House

The Scam at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Scam at Old Rock House

The Scam at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Scam at Old Rock House

The Scam at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

Spaceman climbed up the wall onto a ledge with the bullhorn and then proceeded to walk to the balcony during the song “GG”. There already was a huge pit of colliding individuals, drinks thrown from the balcony, and now a guy on the ledge with a bullhorn.  The place had gone wild.

The Scam at Old Rock House

The Scam at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Scam at Old Rock House

The Scam at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Scam at Old Rock House

The Scam at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

They were brilliantly crazy and had that “I just don’t give an f —-”  edge that made for a truly entertaining show. I would highly recommend seeing this band.

Set List:
Dirty Old Shoes
How Could I Be Wrong
So What
Rock Bottom
Problems
Minor Wounds
Death Wish
Say Another Word
Fatty
GG
Good Bye

Following the big performance of The Scam, the legendary San Francisco band The Dwarves took to the stage. The Dwarves is a band that has been around since the early 80s. Formed in Chicago, the band has since relocated to the Bay area. Known for being loud and controversial, the band has had a lewd (nudity on stage) and allegedly drug prone past.

The Dwarves at Old Rock House

The Dwarves at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Dwarves at Old Rock House

The Dwarves at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Dwarves at Old Rock House

The Dwarves at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

On this night, the band opened up in an energetic fashion with vocalist Blag Dhalia motioning to the crowd, “C’mon!”.  Immediately the crazy mosh pit returned. This time the mob was centered towards the stage, and it was ferocious. In veteran fashion, the band worked both ends of the stage, amping the energy of the room. Blag Dhalia could be seen diving into the pit, as well as screaming into his microphone placed in the faces of loyal fans. Even The Scam joined in the chaos. Throughout the set, fans would climb on the stage and get tossed head first off the stage by the band. During one particular moment, a fight started to break out on the floor, and The Dwarves had to ask that people stop fighting. This was starting to feel like a rugby match with a soundtrack.

The Dwarves at Old Rock House

The Dwarves at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Dwarves at Old Rock House

The Dwarves at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Dwarves at Old Rock House

The Dwarves at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

The Dwarves performed their high octane set for approximately 40 minutes. At set’s end, outside of the minor fight, the band left the stage having given a performance heavily focused on their music versus being noteworthy for their onstage antics. Overall, it was an adept performance that showcased pure punk sounds.

Headlining the night was Atlanta hard rock band Nashville Pu — y*. Formed in 1997, the band has gained a large underground following around the world. In 1999, they received a grammy nomination for Best Metal Performance for their song “Fried Chicken And Coffee.” The band also has been featured in videogames Jackass, The Game and Rougue Trip, the movie Snake Eyes, and the HBO series The Sopranos.

Nashville

Nashville P-s-y at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

On this night, the guys and gals touring in support of their 2010 release, From Hell to Texas, took to the stage clearly to make the statement that this was their show. With their raw garage band sound,  guitarist Ruyter Suys, dressed in tight denim and busting out of her top, took to the stage and instantly started ripping into chords, while her long blonde hair was flailing through the air. With bassist Karen Cuda strumming away on the opposite end of the stage, all the middle aged, beligerantly drunk men could not seem to get enough of the two ladies. Vocalist Blaine Cartwright accentuated the aura with his gritty southern style vocals. The band sound could be described as .38 Special meets The Black Angels.  This was some great drinking music, and the audience obliged by the pitcher.

Nashville P-s-y at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

Ruyter Suys at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

Nashville Pu

Nashville P-s-y at Old Rock House. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

Nashville P

Karen Cuda. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

Nashville P

Blaine Cartwright. Photo credit: © Ricky Sherman

During the performance, the packed house could be seen bobbing their heads, singing along, and doing the air guitar as the band played the songs “I’m So High”, “From Hell to Texas”, and “Hate and Whisky.” At the end of the night, everyone got what they were looking for… a good time from start to finish.

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